Spring Treasure, Bizarre Weather

Recent news from Trinity Yoga Spring 2015

Spring Treasure – Bizarre Weather
Spring Equinox Newsletter
Happy Spring! I wish this for everyone as I sit in my Vancouver home surrounded by the sweet newborn fragrance of hyacinths blooming on my deck. This is in current contrast to the four feet of snow and blowing blizzards in eastern Canada. (I feel for you!) At a certain point we all crave the promise of spring, no matter where we live. Itā€™s feeling ready to be done with the thaw of too many snowfalls and darker days of winter. And indeed we need it!
Unknowingly and often unwittingly, we must surrender to the eternal life force of cycles and the changes of rebirth and death. Even in parts of the planet where there are less dramatic changes of season, there are noticeable differences in the four quarters of the year. This is particularly true when we take into account the spring and fall equinox and the summer and winter solstice. For the millions of years the planets have been turning, so too have the seasons been cycling and repeating their rhythmic beat to the earth’s constant evolution.

I often ponder how we as a species have adapted to the changing cycles of weather on this planet. We figured out how to go from living in a warm climate in Africa to sorting out what it would take to live in northern climates under many feet of snow. That adaptability is unique to our species.

 

Since becoming paralyzed, I have witnessed in myself and others in the differently-able world, remarkable adaptabilities of the human being and body. Iā€™m amazed at what spectacular adaptogens we are. I feel like Iā€™m in a living lab of adaptability and I see that in others. Against all odds, a person can find new pathways, utilize other parts of the brain to take over functions that are lost and recapitulate oneself emotionally and physically after losing all familiar functions. In truth, it has nothing to do with the individual (however, it will just happen.) This surrender to the powerful and omnipotent life force is so strong as to be unavoidable.

We may think we have all the control and all of the details of our lives figured out: my career, mate, investments, RRSPs, retirement fund, etc, and we can do a pretty good at that. But at some point life will take us by surprise. Whether the event is personal, social or environmental, we are called to on to discover and uncover that incredible capacity within ourselves to adapt. Like the bulbs and small seeds waiting to push through the earth, the most important piece of becoming is first the surrender of being.

Like all of life, the surrender happens not because we know what will come, but because we learn to trust in the ancient wisdom, constancy and intelligence of the life force. With time or experience (or both), we realize that we are that life force and are ultimately surrendering to that which is the best in ourselves.

There are many ways to learn more about adaptability in this seasons offerings. These include the classes listed below. We also have classes and events listed on our Facebook Events page.

As one of my favourite teachers would say: “We can’t argue with reality but we can learn how to master it.”

I am pleased to say that you have many opportunities to try on something new this spring and summer and stretch into your own adaptability. That is something we at Trinity Yoga have been doing and I am pleased to announce our new program of Advanced Teacher Training. This is an awesome opportunity to hone in your teaching skills if you’ve been teaching or feeling like you need inspiration or you want to stretch and specialize or develop your practice more. We have an awesome roster of Senior Teachers for the Level 2 slated for June 21-26 in Fairmont BC. We are thrilled to be joined by Trinity alumni, Brenda Cartier, Sophie Ann Dufresne, AND Jennifer Steed!! Also, the new Adaptive Yoga Training is being offered in Vancouver, Cranbrook and Kelowna, be sure to check out our website for details. This month Jennifer steed will be featured on our website www.trinityyoga.net with her new CD release Every Day Yoga.

Bountiful Spring Blessings,

Mary-Jo

“Destiny grants us our wishes, but in its own way, in order to give us something beyond our wishes.” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Upcoming
Adaptive Yoga Training – VANCOUVER
Come and learn the life-giving techniques and theories of Adaptive Yoga from one who knows. Mary-Jo Fetterly ERYT-500 will conduct a15 hour training for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals, family and friends. All you need to know to safely and creatively use yoga for different physical conditions and challenges. May 2nd and 3rd, Inner Evolution 16th & Heather $250, $200 before April 15th. Clients FREE www.trinityyoga.net, 604 754-4488

Practice, Power, Purpose – Tantra and Healing Power of Yoga – CRANBROOK
The ancient science of Yoga offers volumes of knowledge on how to live your best life possible. Tantra yoga is the system of tools and techniques that guides practitioners progressively toward this exalted state. Understanding and being able to access the potency and limitless-ness of Prana, to have more freedom, more health, a greater sense of knowingness & intuition and spontaneous creativity, with less fear and more joy- is the promise of Tantra yoga. 3 hour Mini-Workshop on Friday May 29, 6 to 9 PM. Exhale Yoga Studio 14A 201 13th Ave So. $45 Contact Brenda at Exhale Yoga or 1-250-489-9210
Adaptive Yoga Training – CRANBROOK
Come and learn the life-giving techniques and theories of Adaptive Yoga from one who knows. Mary-Jo Fetterly ERYT-500 will conduct a 15 hour training for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals, family and friends on all you need to know, to safely and creatively use yoga for different physical conditions abilities or challenges. May 29th 30th, Exhale Yoga Studio 14A 201 13th Ave So. $287or $225 before April 30. Clients FREE Contact Brenda at brendacartier@shaw.ca or 1-250-489-9210
Trinity Yoga Teacher Training – Level 2
Prepare yourself to advance your teaching to the next level. The continuation of Trinity Yoga 3 tier training. June 21st-26th, Fairmont Hot Springs Resort in the Columbia Valley of BC. Must book by April 30. Details at www.trinityyoga.net/events or maryjoyogo@gmail.com.
Teachers Advanced Yoga – Trinity Mastery Training at Fairmont Hot Springs Resort
A opportunity for current teachers to study in greater depth the advanced techniques and theories with Senior Teachers. Learn techniques from experienced teachers in a broad range of subject areas. You will learn more about the business of yoga and how to make it work for you, about sequencing and the Art of composition, the theory behind the Doshas and the Gunas relating to a student’s practice and physical & mental health. We will delve further into the chakras and the energy systems as well as offer specialized classes and theory on: restorative, adaptive and therapeutic yoga. June 22nd-25th, 9-5 PM, Fairmont Hot Springs Resort in the Columbia Valley of BC. $125/day or $300 for all 4. Details at www.trinityyoga.net/events or maryjoyogo@gmail.com
2 Offices for Rent in Beautiful Yoga Studio
HOT SPRINGS YOGA STUDIO is nestled in the Columbia Valley between the magnificent Rocky & Purcell Mountain Ranges, just a few minutes away from the therapeutic natural mineral pools!!! A great location to capture the attention of the annual tourist market located in the Fairmont Village Mall, Fairmont Hot Springs, BC. We currently offer Yoga, Qi Gong, Zumba, Holistic Bodywork, Coaching, Workshops & Retreats! There are 2 offices available to rent within the studio. Contact Pamela 778-525-0022 www.hotspringsstudio.ca

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Trinity Yoga
Vancouver, BC
Canada

 

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Level 3 Squamish, Aug.31/06

First Night
I’m wrestling with my sleeping bag. The plastic-coated mattress amplifies my restless fit.I should have brought my pillow. My list of excuses is thick: no room in my bag; I want to rough it; I’m practicing non-attachment.

If I had my pillow I’d feel at home. Where is home? My heart beats, like a knock on the door. Oh yeah, it’s right here. All this commotion looking for comfort. So simple, come home.

I close my eyes. I toss, flip and turn. I settle into the rhythm of my active sleep. Santosha, I am content.

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Yoga on Kits Beach

I walked down to Kits beach this morning for my meditation and asana practice. I carried my mat, blanket and silence down to a grassy spot between the trees. Behind me the Yoga Boot Camp sargeant was whooping willing buttocks into shape.What a beautiful contrast…

He was wearing camo and black boots. His students kicked and punched their lululemoned limbs into the air. I sat in silence, wrapped in a furry shawl. I closed my eyes and listened – bicycles whizzed by, runners clomped along and doggies pitter pattered around me.

I sang an improvised version of the mantra that Jen taught us yesterday. “Kundalini, ari-shakti. Namo, namo. Namo, namo…”. As I sang, I held my new Level 3 friends in my heart.

I wiggled around in my downward dog. Between my legs I could see the Boot Campers holding Upper Chaturanga – juicing their abdominals and hopefully breathing.

Stretched out on my mat, I wound my practice down with a few twists. As I turned to face my right – a man armed with a notebook approached. This was not entirely unusual – I have taught yoga to strangers in parks.

He asked me if this was a good time to talk. I smiled and unwound from my twist. He told me about a new TV series that he’s producing the Eternal Wellness Show. He’s looking to recruit a few good yogis for the trailer. Sunrise yoga on the beach … sounds lovely.

The Vancouver Trinity crew popped into my brain. I told him that I’d put him in contact with some beautiful yogis. So if you’re up for being filmed this FRIDAY Sept.8 – please give him a shout. Feel free to pass this message on to any other yoga souls in the area.

Francisco MacDugall 604.733.1890
francisco@inovativo.com

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Final week at KYM

Although nothing can compare to a Trinity closing circle the final day of the KYM International Program was certainly special. Students and teachers shared a south Indian lunch served on palm leaves and a closing ceremony with speeches, chanting and certificates.

During the week we were treated to several special presentations – a classical dance performance and an asana demonstration by our teacher, Lara. Between other dazzling feats he performed each vinyasa with one leg behind his head. I take back anything I said about the simplicity of the practice!
Throughout the last week we were given several opportunities to question TKV and Kaustub Desikachar about anything that has come up for us during the course, the yoga path and/or life.

One classmate asked, “I live in LA where I have learned from many teachers but still I have not found the right one. How does one find a teacher?”

Kaustub replied, “Well, let me ask you – are you ready to be a student?”
Perhaps when we are ready we do not need to search.

Here at the KYM, where the lessons of Krishnamacharya are carried on with faith and diligence, I feel I visited the heart of yoga. Continuous acts of compassion, healing and devotion opened my eyes wider yet to the infinite wisdom of the yoga path. Before leaving, with head bowed, I placed lotus flowers at the photograph of Krishnamacharya and the statue of Patanjali.

I am grateful to my teachers in India as well as my teachers at home and all the teachers I have yet to meet. And in answer to Kaustub’s question – Yes, I am ready to be a student.

Thank you for sharing this experience with me!
OM shanti namaste.

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Week 2 at KYM

The second week of the Universal Yet Personal Program at KYM has passed. A weekend at the nearby beach town of Mahallapurum helped clear my mind (and my sinuses) and somehow the city of Chennai is seeming easier to endure. Or perhaps I am mastering that tricky niyama, Samtosha!Asana practice at KYM is much different than the vigourous practice to which I am accustomed. I will admit that during the first few days I was somewhat disappointed. A voice whispered “my grandmother could do this”. But as I mentioned before each day built upon the foundation and it is obvious that classes have been designed with great care and intention. Just as we were warned against, I think I may be so eager to learn new and spectacular things that I am missing the subtle yet profound lessons being taught. Let the breath guide the movement…

AT KYM we practice classical postures in dynamic repetition, often changing the breath ratio. For example, we might practice trikonasana: exhale down, inhale up on each side (3 x), exhale down, hold for 1 breath, inhale up on each side (1x), exhale down, hold for 2 breaths, inhale up on each side (1x), exhale down , hold for 3 breaths, inhale up on each side (1x). Or sitting in padmasana: inhale 2 exhale 4, 4:8, 5:10 and so on. For those interested I can explain more or share my daily lesson plans.

Aside from children’s classes and special programs such as the one I am attending, KYM does not offer group classes for adults. Perhaps this explains why we are given very little description, correction or modification in our group asana class (?). Generally an adult student meets with a consultant and then is assigned to a teacher who gives a program customized to the student’s goal, ability, age, physical and emotional considerations etc. (Next week I have a private consultation, which I will write about)

It seems that most students who come to the mandarim come for therapeutic reasons. The most valuable lessons I have experiences (and the pace is picking up so there have been many) have taken place in the Applications of Yoga class. Krishnamacharya was a firm believer in the therapeutic and healing potential of yoga and citkitsu, or therapy, is one of the most vital components at KYM. Kaustub Desikachar has said that this class is unlike any other in the world. Basic principles taught in this course are to observe the patient as a whole (holistically), practice ahimsa working towards a realistic goal and the impact of sradyha (faith and positive attitude), ie. healing from within. We have learned to observe bodies for misalignments or deviations and then develop a program to reduce pain, increase flexibility and build strength.

During the week our teacher, Saraswati has introduced us to several KYM students and we have learned how yoga therapy has helped ease their pain and often prevent them from surgery that was deemed necessary by
allopathic doctors. Currently KYM is involved in extensive research involving yoga and epilepsy.

Another week of study over, I plan to find enlightenment this weekend. šŸ˜‰ I’m travelling to the holy town of Tiruvannamalai to visit the ashram of Sri Ramana Maharishi, the great guru of Self-Realization. Who am I?

Blessings from India.

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Week 3 at KYM

Namaste.

The third week at KYM ended with 2 related lectures: Yoga and Mantras by Kaustub and the significance and classical steps of meditating OM by S.Sridharan and “Sir” ( how Desikachar is referred to with reverence).Who knew that chanting OM and other mantras traditionally begins with a prayer, then sipping 3 sips of water while reciting a specific mantra, than pranayama in preparation, then samkalpa or setting of intension, then nyasam – reciting the different components of the mantra while touching different parts of the body, then visualization… all this before the japam or recitation of the mantra!

This week’s theory class focussed on classical preparatory postures and counterposes. Something new for me – classically bujangasana is the counterpose of sarvangasana. Fish posture is considered too great a strain on the neck and classically all counterpostures are dynamic.

Philosophy class has involved a study of the 8 limbs of yoga with a lengthy discussion on ishwara prandihara or surrender to a higher being. In applications class we have focussed on the neck, lower back and knee injuries as well as diabetes and PMS. In chanting class we’re learning at a faster pace and getting good! Although, I don’t know if the teacher would agree.

I had a private consultation with the resident doctor/ yoga therapist at KYM. The consultation was not long – maybe 20 minutes. My health concerns were minor ( I went more for the experience). We discussed my ailments, lifestyle, diet etc, he took my pulse and then observed while I performed some simple movements both standing and lying. The doctor gave me some advice on my current daily practice as well as a short daily practice to help with digestion. A fellow student with a slipped disc reported some great relief after 4 days of her assigned practice.

That’s all to share for this week. The month is flying by. I presume that at this point I cannot even imagine the wealth of knowledge I have gathered. The lessons I am learning will take a long time to sink in and integrate. It is wonderful to share this experience with people from such different yoga backgrounds as viniyoga, iyengar, sivananada, anusara, ashtanga, scaravelli, radiant light and kundalini. I have learned so much from my new friends.

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Week 2 at KYM

The second week of the Universal Yet Personal Program at KYM has passed. A weekend at the nearby beach town of Mahallapurum helped clear my mind (and my sinuses) and somehow the city of Chennai is seeming easier to endure. Or perhaps I am mastering that tricky niyama, Samtosha!Asana practice at KYM is much different than the vigourous practice to which I am accustomed. I will admit that during the first few days I was somewhat disappointed. A voice whispered “my grandmother could do this”. But as I mentioned before each day built upon the foundation and it is obvious that classes have been designed with great care and intention. Just as we were warned against, I think I may be so eager to learn new and spectacular things that I am missing the subtle yet profound lessons being taught. Let the breath guide the movement…

AT KYM we practice classical postures in dynamic repetition, often changing the breath ratio. For example, we might practice trikonasana: exhale down, inhale up on each side (3 x), exhale down, hold for 1 breath, inhale up on each side (1x), exhale down, hold for 2 breaths, inhale up on each side (1x), exhale down , hold for 3 breaths, inhale up on each side (1x). Or sitting in padmasana: inhale 2 exhale 4, 4:8, 5:10 and so on. For those interested I can explain more or share my daily lesson plans.

Aside from children’s classes and special programs such as the one I am attending, KYM does not offer group classes for adults. Perhaps this explains why we are given very little description, correction or modification in our group asana class (?). Generally an adult student meets with a consultant and then is assigned to a teacher who gives a program customized to the student’s goal, ability, age, physical and emotional considerations etc. (Next week I have a private consultation, which I will write about)

It seems that most students who come to the mandarim come for therapeutic reasons. The most valuable lessons I have experiences (and the pace is picking up so there have been many) have taken place in the Applications of Yoga class. Krishnamacharya was a firm believer in the therapeutic and healing potential of yoga and citkitsu, or therapy, is one of the most vital components at KYM. Kaustub Desikachar has said that this class is unlike any other in the world. Basic principles taught in this course are to observe the patient as a whole (holistically), practice ahimsa working towards a realistic goal and the impact of sradyha (faith and positive attitude), ie. healing from within. We have learned to observe bodies for misalignments or deviations and then develop a program to reduce pain, increase flexibility and build strength.

During the week our teacher, Saraswati has introduced us to several KYM students and we have learned how yoga therapy has helped ease their pain and often prevent them from surgery that was deemed necessary by
allopathic doctors. Currently KYM is involved in extensive research involving yoga and epilepsy.

Another week of study over, I plan to find enlightenment this weekend. šŸ˜‰ I’m travelling to the holy town of Tiruvannamalai to visit the ashram of Sri Ramana Maharishi, the great guru of Self-Realization. Who am I?

Blessings from India.

Please follow and like us:

Week 3 at KYM

Namaste.

The third week at KYM ended with 2 related lectures: Yoga and Mantras by Kaustub and the significance and classical steps of meditating OM by S.Sridharan and “Sir” ( how Desikachar is referred to with reverence).Who knew that chanting OM and other mantras traditionally begins with a prayer, then sipping 3 sips of water while reciting a specific mantra, than pranayama in preparation, then samkalpa or setting of intension, then nyasam – reciting the different components of the mantra while touching different parts of the body, then visualization… all this before the japam or recitation of the mantra!

This week’s theory class focussed on classical preparatory postures and counterposes. Something new for me – classically bujangasana is the counterpose of sarvangasana. Fish posture is considered too great a strain on the neck and classically all counterpostures are dynamic.

Philosophy class has involved a study of the 8 limbs of yoga with a lengthy discussion on ishwara prandihara or surrender to a higher being. In applications class we have focussed on the neck, lower back and knee injuries as well as diabetes and PMS. In chanting class we’re learning at a faster pace and getting good! Although, I don’t know if the teacher would agree.

I had a private consultation with the resident doctor/ yoga therapist at KYM. The consultation was not long – maybe 20 minutes. My health concerns were minor ( I went more for the experience). We discussed my ailments, lifestyle, diet etc, he took my pulse and then observed while I performed some simple movements both standing and lying. The doctor gave me some advice on my current daily practice as well as a short daily practice to help with digestion. A fellow student with a slipped disc reported some great relief after 4 days of her assigned practice.

That’s all to share for this week. The month is flying by. I presume that at this point I cannot even imagine the wealth of knowledge I have gathered. The lessons I am learning will take a long time to sink in and integrate. It is wonderful to share this experience with people from such different yoga backgrounds as viniyoga, iyengar, sivananada, anusara, ashtanga, scaravelli, radiant light and kundalini. I have learned so much from my new friends.

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Report from Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandarim

In Chennai, India at the Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandarim I am attending the Universal Yet Personal Program, a one month intensive for international students. There are 34 others in the class and we bring experiences of yoga and life from 12 countries. We have completed the first week of training and I now sit down with a chai to reflect upon the experience.
Today TKV Desikachar, the well-known teacher, scholar, healer and founder of the mandarim, spoke on symbols and symbolism. He began with an invocation chant honouring his father and teacher, Tirumalai Krishnamacharyca, who stood behind him in a photograph draped with a garland of marigolds. Desikachar is an inspiring speaker and delightful man with a wisdom, joy and lightness about his being. For me, he seems to exemplify the essence of yoga. Throughout his lecture he quoted Sanskrit sloka from the Yoga Sutras and used examples from his life to explain the meaning of the yamas and niyamas. It is an honour to be learning directly from this lineage.

KYM is a modest building with bamboo posts and a palm-thatched roof. It is believed a place of great spiritual significance as Krishnamacharya was here while living. There is a sense of great reverence for our guru, who is largely responsible for the resurgence of yoga in India in the 1930’s through his teachings, demonstration tours and students Patabbhi Jois, BKS Iyengar, Indra Devi and of course his son, TKV Desikachar. Our classes are taught by the mandarim’s senior teachers with lectures by Desikachar and his son Kaustub. Much different than the west, the teachers (and students) wear saris or salwar kameez and we practice on rugs instead of sticky mats. At the program orientation each of us was greeted with a garland of white, fragrant flowers and a snack of nuts and fruit. S. Sridharan, the managing trustee of KYM addressed us with a request to not judge our lessons quickly – to allow the flower to bloom. Insightfully, he knew that we all come from different cultures and traditions of yoga with various expectations.

The schedule each day consist of the following classes: asana and pranayama, theory of asana and pranayama, philosophy of yoga, vedic chanting (optional), applications of yoga (yoga therapy) and meditation. Often in the evenings there are guest lectures and entertainment.

Each day the asana practice builds upon a basic foundation, adding more complicated asanas and sequences. It is a dynamic practice with a strong emphasis on linking the mind to the breath and body. In theory class we have examined the breath in depth. Unlike many schools of yoga this tradition teaches that the inhalation should be initiated in the upper chest rather than the abdomen, which can restrict the chest and cause a curvature in the lower spine. Chanting class, taught in the Vedic tradition, is a joy and a challenge. Our teacher, Jayanthi, catches each and every incorrect note. The class on applications of yoga consists of workshops, case studies and new information regarding yoga therapy, a major focus at KYM.

Applying the lessons of the classes and the Yoga Sutras is perhaps the most challenging aspect of the course. In today’s lecture Desikachar suggested that we use our personal sun meditation as svadhyaya (self reflection). It should take 25 minutes and if it is shorter we will know that we are dealing with the guna rajas and perhaps need some relaxation exercises. If it is longer we are dealing with tamas and need to practice asanas that invigorate the mind. We can use these findings as consideration while making decisions during the day.

Here in the crowded, dirty, polluted, noisy and poverty-stricken city of Chennai I am working very hard at samtosha (contentment or acceptance of what is). Luckily I am able to spend my lunch breaks at the Krishnamurti Foundation and some evenings listening to devotional singing in the Sri Rama Krishna Temple. I will write again as the flower blooms. Om shanti, shanti, shanti-i.

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