Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain is often associated with an excessive lordotic curve or what is sometimes called a sway back. In order to begin bringing awareness to this and provide some relief you need to bring some length and fullness.

To do this tilt your pelvis back, so that you tail bone moves down towards to earth. Focus on breathing into your lower back so that the area around your Kidneys, at the base of your lower ribs, begins to expand and broaden. This can be done whenever you remember, simple stop for a second breath and adjust your pelvis. This simple action will also begin to engage your lower belly, gently toning and strengthening your abdominals.

It is also important that you wear comfortable shoes preferably without a heel. One other aspect you can incorporate relates to your head, neck and shoulders. While standing, sitting or walking draw the globe of your head back as if some one was gently pulling it back from the top and bottom of the back of your ears.

This subtle shift will expand the front of your chest, roll your shoulder back and down and allow your spine to become more upright. Be mindful that when you move you head back that it doesnt disrupt your pelvis from dropping down.

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Yoga post surgical removal of the colon?

That is a very interesting question as the practicality of doing public classes with ease and comfort while having to duck out to the washroom presents and understandable challenge. Managing a home practise is different though. I would recommend, to begin with or as a balance in a home practise, the Rest and Renew Restorative postures to gain an awareness of movement with ease and to assist the inner body/gut to feel healed. From there a specifically tailored personal program including a variety of the classic postural groupings makes sense with added emphasis to gentle inversions and twists for enhanced inner abdominal circulation. I hope that is a beginning point. For more specifics, please write again as needed.

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Yoga post surgical removal of the colon?

That is a very interesting question as the practicality of doing public classes with ease and comfort while having to duck out to the washroom presents and understandable challenge. Managing a home practise is different though. I would recommend, to begin with or as a balance in a home practise, the Rest and Renew Restorative postures to gain an awareness of movement with ease and to assist the inner body/gut to feel healed. From there a specifically tailored personal program including a variety of the classic postural groupings makes sense with added emphasis to gentle inversions and twists for enhanced inner abdominal circulation. I hope that is a beginning point. For more specifics, please write again as needed.

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Surgery and Yoga

Yoga is a wonderful practice not only for the physical benefits but also for the mental and spiritual ones. With this in mind one great way to stay in tune with your yoga practice when you are less able to get on your mat is through visualization. Find a comfortable position sitting or lying down, take some time to connect to your breath. Slowly guide yourself through an asana practice. See yourself doing each posture with ease and conscious awareness, stay focused on your breath throughout. Begin with a shorter 20 minute practice, as you may be surprised by the effort this practice takes.

Aside from this option working with strengthen the awareness of your bandhas would also be beneficial. Engaging Jalandhara and Mula Bandha while you lie comfortably can be a great practice. Focus on isolating the action to the specific regions of the throat or top of the cervix/perineum. Begin to engage on your inhale, allowing the action to reach it’s peak at the top of the inhalation and release on the exhale, repeat several times.

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Surgery and Yoga

Yoga is a wonderful practice not only for the physical benefits but also for the mental and spiritual ones. With this in mind one great way to stay in tune with your yoga practice when you are less able to get on your mat is through visualization. Find a comfortable position sitting or lying down, take some time to connect to your breath. Slowly guide yourself through an asana practice. See yourself doing each posture with ease and conscious awareness, stay focused on your breath throughout. Begin with a shorter 20 minute practice, as you may be surprised by the effort this practice takes.

Aside from this option working with strengthen the awareness of your bandhas would also be beneficial. Engaging Jalandhara and Mula Bandha while you lie comfortably can be a great practice. Focus on isolating the action to the specific regions of the throat or top of the cervix/perineum. Begin to engage on your inhale, allowing the action to reach it’s peak at the top of the inhalation and release on the exhale, repeat several times.

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Fibromyalgia Advice

From my understanding it would be more appropriate to massage before yoga if having them close together at all. Generally a person with fibromyalgia can only take so much stimulus at one time and even though both the massage and yoga are positive practices one with that condition needs to be discerning. In addittion it is worth mentioning that the yoga practice should be theraputic or restorative for best results.

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Piriformis Syndrome: a pain in the butt

This article will provide a clearer picture on Piriformis Syndrome and how to use Yoga to manage and ease the associated pain.Piriformis syndrome is a description for a set of symptoms that you feel in your butt area – specifically:

  • A dull ache in the mid-butt area
  • Pain that travels or radiates down the back of the legs (aka sciatica)
  • Pain when walking up stairs or an incline
  • Increased pain after prolonged sitting, walking or running
  • Weakened abduction of the flexed thigh, and iliotibial band syndrome
  • Functionally, it is believed to be caused by an excessively tight piriformis muscle. The theory is that when the muscle is really tight, or in spasm, it places pressure on the sciatic nerve, which is located just under the piriformis (and for some people, right through the piriformis). When pressure is placed on the nerve, the “nerve symptoms” like dull aches, radiating sciatic-type pain occur.

    Note, that this is just a theory and that other things may be happening to cause this type of pain to occur – things like bulging or herniated discs, and other spinal problems. Be sure to get these checked out by a physiotherapist specializing in manual therapy, a chiropractor or a sports med doctor.If your spinal column is not the cause and pain continues, a key question to ask is why is the piriformis really tight? A muscle doesn’t just get tight on its own. There are always collaborators!

    The piriformis muscle connects the pelvis to the leg. Therefore, if there is any tightness, imbalance, or dysfunction of the legs or of the pelvis, the piriformis may get really tight and piriformis syndrome may occur.

    The following are some of the collaborators:

  • Hamstrings that are tight and Quadriceps that are weak causing imbalance in the legs.
  • A weak Gluteus Medius causing imbalance in the pelvis.
  • A weak and tight TFL and a tight Iliotibial band causing imbalance in the pelvis.
  • Tight Psoas and Iliacus muscles causing imbalance through the spinal column, pelvis and legs.
  • Feet that are pronated which can cause imbalance in the pelvis.
  • What can we do in Yoga?

    If someone is experiencing the pain and symptoms associated with piriformis syndrome, they need to ease out of their Yoga practice. Trying to stretch through the pain will not improve the functioning.

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    Legs up the Wall | Trinity Yoga

    Legs Up the Wall

    legs up the wall
    Source: {http://blog.gaiam.com/6-yoga-poses-for-insomnia}

    This posture, Virprita Karani, is extremely beneficial for many reasons. First and foremost it is a restorative posture, which allows the body to absorb the condition of relaxation. According to Judith Lasiter one cannot force relaxation one can only set up the conditions for relaxation to occur. Legs up the wall offers wonderful benefits to the central nervous system, the adrenals, as well as the circulatory system and organs.

    It is recommended for those suffering from varicose veins, circulatory problems, menstrual cramps and overall stress.The most difficult aspect of this asana is getting into it correctly, it is rather awkward. Begin with your mat ninety degrees to the wall or a doorframe, with the door securely closed.

    Have another mat, tightly rolled up, close by if you would like a deep release in your lower back. Bring yourself to the wall sideways with your buttocks as close to the wall as possible, legs alongside the wall. Then turn into the wall letting your legs go up as your torso lowers down onto the mat.

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