Uncategorized

Upside-down Dog

Turning yourself “upside down” is a good thing. Too often, we live our lives from the neck up, and by thinking too much we lose the moment and our connection to our bodies. Many of our physical problems actually arise simply because we live too much in our heads. When you turn your world upside down, symbolically & metaphorically, you change that. This yoga asana is excellent medicine for anxiety, obsessiveness and an ego that’s stuck or unyielding.

Inversions (a type of asana in which the feet are lifted higher than the heart) have many other health benefits. The inversion of the circulatory system and the flushing out of venous blood brings an increase in blood flow to the brain and a general feeling of well being. The endrocrine glands, the digestive system and the lymphatic system are also cleansed and re-vitalized. In order to do this very wonderful modification of the Downward Dog asana, you will need a wall and a mat (please don’t do it at a tree in the park unless you are very accomplished!). Begin by assuming your full downward dog position with your heels against the wall and your body coming out at 90 degrees along your mat. From a very strong downward dog, lift one leg at a time up the wall until your legs are in line with your hips. You will need good upper body strength to carry this pose off so be sure you are ready. Keep pressing your heels into the wall to activate the hips and remember to breathe. Allow your head to let go giving yourself full permission to trust and to explore your own strength and concentration.

Published by Mary-Jo

I am passionate about diversity, inclusion, sustainability and community. Having raised my children in a small B.C. town as a single parent, I relied on the community, my resourcefulness and the land to sustain us. We developed a market farm,built a cafe and catering business that utilized the produce, local farmers and families to thrive. As a Waldorf school parent I became experienced in biodiversity, edible landscapes and community engagement. I gained substantial skills in leadership, facilitation, project management, communication through teaching yoga and running various business's. My role as a facilitator and trainer to individuals seeking to become a yoga teacher- whom never thought that they could stand in front of a room and speak in public, gave me insight into human nature and coaching. In addition to designing and building businesses - cafés, yoga studios and national training programs, I am a student of Social Development & Social Psychology and understand the complexity and importance of social engagement. I can handle with grace most any situation, having encountered a disability later in life. Consequent to becoming disabled and through advocacy and providing peer support I have trained and acquired extensive exposure and understanding of UN principles on disability, The Human Rights objectives, theories and principles of Universal Design and the various challenges and obstacles for those affected and the relationship to various stakeholders. After 30 years of teaching yoga, my spinal cord injury and subsequent sabbatical has allowed for the integration of my yoga and more in-depth study of the Healing Arts. I have had the fortune of working with some of the best in the field of rehabilitation, Somatic Experiencing and manual therapy including Emilie Conrad, Mark Finch, Judy Russel, Rod Stryker, Carolyn Myss, Ana Forest, & Tim Miller, Susan Harper, Mariah Moser, Herta Buller and Nature.